Great Morning for a Ride – Spoiled by Getting Online

Last night, before I went to bed, I checked the outside temperature – it was 69 F so I turned off the AC and opened the windows.  I woke up cold to the sound of my neighbor’s dog eating breakfast and the birds.  Good morning for a ride I thought.

I left the house at about 7:10 AM and it was about 60F (Weird weather for August in MD).  Not quite as cold as my ride two years ago but still a bit brisk as I got going.  No worries though, I soon worked up enough body heat to get comfortable.

I rode down to the end of the B&A trail, just north of US50 and took a break.  Spoke with a really nice older gentleman with what sounded like an Irish accent.  We both got back on the bikes at the same time, but of course, he smoked me as he pulled away.  No worries.

A few short minutes later, I passed another cyclist going in the other direction who seemed to know me, but I was not sure who it was.  I kept riding for a few more miles and suddenly there was a familiar voice next to me.  It was my neighbor who does triathlons.

We rode about 2 miles together making small talk about vacations, the neighborhood, and bikes.  One topic that did come up was wrecks.  He said he saw a woman get hit a few weeks ago at the intersection of the trail and McKinsey Road.  It sounded really bad.

I’ve had a few wrecks in my life, fortunately none involving a car.  They are never good.

So, I sit down at the computer this morning and find Johnny’s latest comment about a memorial for a cyclist who was hit by a truck in Baltimore.  Coverage is nicely compiled here.  The responses that are on the websites of the Sun are absolutely unacceptable.  The attitudes of many of the people toward this man’s untimely death seem to vary widely, but the most prevalent on is that it was his fault cause he shouldn’t be on the road.

Well, that just ticks me off.  Maryland law indicates that cyclists have the same rights to the road (and the same responsibilities in terms of obeying traffic signals and signalling their intentions).

I’m trying to get back to the good place where I was before I turned on the computer.  But it’s hard when I see people publicly and callously dismiss the death of someone who was simply riding his bike.

One response

  1. You and me both, bro. that story made me downright agoraphobic. I’ve been basement-bound on the trainer most of this year. Reading these stories makes me worry.

    Having said that, there are things that we cyclists need to do to protect ourselves. Techniques for riding (avoiding the right hook – a woman trying to park her car in my neighborhood tried to do that to me (idiot)) can make it safer. And of course, being cautious. The trail should be pretty safe, but those intersections are definitely points for caution. Especially the ones with blind spots (for those of us riding).

    The media is dead wrong on almost all accounts in my book. They skew news to keep their jobs and not piss anybody off (except the victims). The only recourse we have is activism, education, the kind of work that Bob and Barry are doing in Bmore and the work being done by one less car.

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